Category Archives: Science

High Speed Video & Incorporating Sound!

High Speed Video Sound

Nick Moore the creator of the Youtube channel of the same name has done a primer video on the recording of audio along with high-speed video.  He goes into some detail about the usability aspects and limitations of recording audiothat is usable. Interestingly it can also mean you are better off faking the audio in post production for a better effect especially if you want it for a movie or tv show that demands quality audio.

The frequencies needed and data capture rate matter a lot in slow motion audio recording.  In the end, it is a balancing act of what can be heard by the human ear and what you can exploit on reasonable time frames. It is much easier for example to record audio up to 240fps but it becomes increasingly less usable the higher the frame rate goes. At 1000fps you probably will not have anything worth keeping.[...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Solar Eclipse Slow Motion Recording?

We have received quite a few messages about how to shoot the solar eclipse next Monday, August 21st 2017 in slow motion.  After all the more frames you capture, the more temporal detail that will be preserved but there is a threshold when diminishing returns from shooting high fps take a toll on image quality, dynamic range and color accuracy.

In short, the rule of shooting the total solar eclipse at high speed will be based on timing on one hand and detail retention on the other. We have found in our research that you really do not need more than 120fps in order to get a great solar corona snapshot with enough detail and variance.  24 and 30fps regular frame rates are also good and perfectly acceptable.[...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Rumor Mill & Rocket Slow-Mo Videos!

Rumor Mill Rocket Slow-Mo

If you ever wanted to see slow motion footage of the Apollo 13 Saturn V rocket on liftoff here is your chance. The video uploaded about 5 years ago by  Spacecraft Films an aerospace related footage company that has some of the most compelling video on the subject. See http://www.spacecraftfilms.com/blog/ for more information on their footage and usage rights.

[...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Hummingbird Science Hi Speed on Nat Geo!

Hummingbird Science

The National Geographic Channel in conjunction with  Clark lab at US RiversideDudley lab at UC Berkeley,   have posted a video that shows the process of capturing hummingbirds in flight, feeding, and doing acrobatics all in glorious 4k at 2000fps.  It is probably the most scientifically worthy portrayal of hummingbirds in flight ever to be documented.

The intricacies of flight, hovering and coping with the environmental elements that hummingbirds have to fend off and how they accomplish it are now being deciphered with the help of 4k Phantom Flex cameras in great detail mainly shot by naturalist filmmaker Anand Varma.  This is all part of a recent National Geographic story on hummingbirds here![...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Slow Motion News & Footage July!

Slow Motion News

July is typically a slow month for hardware news but there are still several things happening on the slow motion front that deserves your attention. We have gathered a series of information and footage that is becoming viral with the help of slow motion imaging.

A fairly new Youtube Channel “9 Months old” is gaining momentum by filming a 60,000PSI water jet cutter slicing through all sorts of objects.  We are very impressed with the results of the Waterjet Channel and what they have been able to film in such a short time. They just broke 300k subscribers which is no easy feat.  We share their latest video and urge you to subscribe in order to support their endeavors.[...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion DIY!

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion

Sometimes all it takes to embark on a new project is some unexpected inspiration.  On the Incredible Slow Motion video by Veritasium – Seeing the Invisible: Schlieren Imaging in SLOW MOTION we are not only inspired but awestruck by the results of this simple and doable at home scientific experiment.   The experiment allows a camera to visualize the vortexes of gases and temperature differences in the air which serve to create some very interesting scientific experiments and or artistic visualizations.

You will need a Concave Parabolic Mirror like the ones used in reflective Newtonian telescopes, “you may have one lying around from your stargazing days”,  you will also need a small light source like an LED flashlight or single diode and finally a razor blade or similar precise object to cut off the light to the camera on a plane.[...] → Continue Reading Full Post ←