Category Archives: tutorials

Slow Motion Fractions From the Web June 2019

Slow Motion Fractions

To better encapsulate the slow motion happenings of the web we are starting a new post type called Fraction/s as in “Fractions of a Second” that shows anything and everything related to slow motion that has happened recently.  This is based on the fact that high speed imaging hardware releases have been stabilizing and slowing down compared to previous years.  This way we can better cover anything small or large related to this craft.

Thanks to our readers who have submitted a lot of this information which sometimes escapes us. There is a lot of interest in slow motion related information but it is easy to get buried in the mountain of daily information. We hope that we cover many of these occurrences so you get to see them. → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Chronos 1.4 Survives 180Gs of Force Strapped on Mower Blade!

Chronos 1.4 Mower

The Tesla500 Youtube Channel is at it again with an impressive build and experiment. David Kronstein the creator of the Chronos has attached a camera to a specially modified mower and blade assembly to shoot what a lawnmower does directly on the blade’s edge.  The mower was only run at 1/2 speed, to avoid a camera failure, resulted in about 180 G-forces at the edge of the camera.

Needless to say, it really shows how good the camera is at withstanding abuse.  While we do not condone you do this with any camera it is cool to know it can be done and still have beautiful high speed imagery to go with it. Congrats to David for the successful build!   The G-forces involved would kill any living thing with a brain in seconds hence why a camera is a good subject, Please don’t try this at home! Watch the video below: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Recording Audio For Slow Motion Footage!

Smarter Every Day has posted a very nice example video of audio master Gordon McGladdery recording audio to be incorporated into slow motion footage. Since recording real slow motion sound that is usable at super high speeds is an impossibility due to the undiscernable pitch that results from it, you need to get creative with some reverb, echo, pitch, and chamber audio effects in order to get a compelling final product.  We are big fans of both their channels and make sure you check them out for supporting them.

CNET Makes Basic Phone Slow Motion How-To Video!

 We find that while the video is simple, it does a good job in explaining the methods on Apple’s iOS and Android to get slow motion footage ready for posting on the web or social media.   There is some basic editing and trimming for cutting the nonaction parts.

You can find the official video link here if needed: https://www.cnet.com/videos/make-slow-motion-videos-on-a-phone/

High Speed Video & Incorporating Sound!

High Speed Video Sound

Nick Moore the creator of the Youtube channel of the same name has done a primer video on the recording of audio along with high-speed video.  He goes into some detail about the usability aspects and limitations of recording audiothat is usable. Interestingly it can also mean you are better off faking the audio in post production for a better effect especially if you want it for a movie or tv show that demands quality audio.

The frequencies needed and data capture rate matter a lot in slow motion audio recording.  In the end, it is a balancing act of what can be heard by the human ear and what you can exploit on reasonable time frames. It is much easier for example to record audio up to 240fps but it becomes increasingly less usable the higher the frame rate goes. At 1000fps you probably will not have anything worth keeping. → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion DIY!

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion

Sometimes all it takes to embark on a new project is some unexpected inspiration.  On the Incredible Slow Motion video by Veritasium – Seeing the Invisible: Schlieren Imaging in SLOW MOTION we are not only inspired but awestruck by the results of this simple and doable at home scientific experiment.   The experiment allows a camera to visualize the vortexes of gases and temperature differences in the air which serve to create some very interesting scientific experiments and or artistic visualizations.

You will need a Concave Parabolic Mirror like the ones used in reflective Newtonian telescopes, “you may have one lying around from your stargazing days”,  you will also need a small light source like an LED flashlight or single diode and finally a razor blade or similar precise object to cut off the light to the camera on a plane. → Continue Reading Full Post ←