Tag Archives: how to

Slow Motion Tutorial for Premiere Pro CC by Becki and Chris!

Ever wondered how to use slow-motion footage effectively with Premiere Pro CC from Adobe’s Creative Cloud? This quick tutorial by YouTubers Becki and Chris will go through the basics of capturing, editing and organizing the footage for a consistent workflow.  They used cameras like the GoPro Hero 5 Black, Sony a7s II, and the DJI Osmo to capture the footage.

Their techniques will apply to any camera that shots high frame rates like 60p and above.  Maybe in a future tutorial, they are able to use higher frame rate footage from more capable cameras and even use the optical flow feature to really slow things down in post. You can subscribe to their channel here and support them! → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Recording Audio For Slow Motion Footage!

Smarter Every Day has posted a very nice example video of audio master Gordon McGladdery recording audio to be incorporated into slow motion footage. Since recording real slow motion sound that is usable at super high speeds is an impossibility due to the undiscernable pitch that results from it, you need to get creative with some reverb, echo, pitch, and chamber audio effects in order to get a compelling final product.  We are big fans of both their channels and make sure you check them out for supporting them.

CNET Makes Basic Phone Slow Motion How-To Video!

 We find that while the video is simple, it does a good job in explaining the methods on Apple’s iOS and Android to get slow motion footage ready for posting on the web or social media.   There is some basic editing and trimming for cutting the nonaction parts.

You can find the official video link here if needed: https://www.cnet.com/videos/make-slow-motion-videos-on-a-phone/

High Speed Video & Incorporating Sound!

High Speed Video Sound

Nick Moore the creator of the Youtube channel of the same name has done a primer video on the recording of audio along with high-speed video.  He goes into some detail about the usability aspects and limitations of recording audiothat is usable. Interestingly it can also mean you are better off faking the audio in post production for a better effect especially if you want it for a movie or tv show that demands quality audio.

The frequencies needed and data capture rate matter a lot in slow motion audio recording.  In the end, it is a balancing act of what can be heard by the human ear and what you can exploit on reasonable time frames. It is much easier for example to record audio up to 240fps but it becomes increasingly less usable the higher the frame rate goes. At 1000fps you probably will not have anything worth keeping. → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion DIY!

Schlieren Imaging Slow Motion

Sometimes all it takes to embark on a new project is some unexpected inspiration.  On the Incredible Slow Motion video by Veritasium – Seeing the Invisible: Schlieren Imaging in SLOW MOTION we are not only inspired but awestruck by the results of this simple and doable at home scientific experiment.   The experiment allows a camera to visualize the vortexes of gases and temperature differences in the air which serve to create some very interesting scientific experiments and or artistic visualizations.

You will need a Concave Parabolic Mirror like the ones used in reflective Newtonian telescopes, “you may have one lying around from your stargazing days”,  you will also need a small light source like an LED flashlight or single diode and finally a razor blade or similar precise object to cut off the light to the camera on a plane. → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Fake Slow Motion Is It Worth It?

Fake Slow Motion

There has been a lot of work put it developing software that can interpolate frames for video editing and compositing applications. Twixtor in the late 90’s was perhaps the first time the technology could make something worthwhile and really produce acceptable results in a computationally acceptable timeframe.

Today the most used algorithm is Adobe’s Optical Flow in Premiere or Time Warp in After Effects which use vector directional plus acceleration of pixel values to derive in between frame data to generate new frame information from the preceding frame as point A and the next frame as point B.  The results can do some wonders to really slow down things above the frame rate ceiling of the camera. → Continue Reading Full Post ←