Tag Archives: science

Slow Motion Videos of the Week!

Slow Motion Videos of the Week

We have seen quite a lot of new slow motion footage inundate the Intertubes this week.  The amount and quality of the footage seem to have exploded recently with more and more cameras able to shoot at higher frame rates and at qualities that make it bearable to watch. Of course, there is also the occasional professional high speed camera shot i.e Phantom Flex 4k, which makes it the icing on the cake.

It is also time to get inspired by looking at the work of others to better your own shooting and gather new ideas or inspiration.  It is time to lay back and relax while you watch some extremely cool slow motion footage. And as always remember to be safe if you attempt any of the stunts or experiments shot.  Take Care!

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Slow Motion News Update May!

Slow Motion News Update

There has been some news on the slow motion front that we would like to share. While nothing is a new product announcement for budget conscious consumers; there is good technology being released that shoots high frame rates very often.  We are expecting some new cameras before the end of this year that should push the technology envelope further while still being widely available.

Some slow motion camera projects are maturing like the Chronos 1.4 and the fps1000HD which seem unstoppable now.  While both of these cameras are 720p resolution; sensor technology has advanced leaps ahead of what was available just 3 years ago when it comes to fairly priced CMOS Global Shutter designs. We expect the first 1080p camera that shoots very high frame rates to be announced in the next two years as technology has finally caught up with budgets.

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TIME 100 Pictures Remembers Edgerton

Time 100

Time magazine list of the 100 Most influential images of all time is a fantastic collection of visuals that encompass everything from nature, science, celebrities to world changing events. One of the images is the Milk Drop by Harold “Doc” Edgerton, the inventor of modern high speed imaging at MIT.

They have also created a mini documentary to go along with the image that you should check out. See in the link below:

http://100photos.time.com/photos/harold-edgerton-milk-drop

More images from Edgerton and his research at this site!

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5 Amazing Slow Motion Videos!

5 Amazing Slow Motion Videos

We have to share some amazingly cool slow motion videos we came across recently.  There is continuous production of quality high speed content as the democratization of slow motion cameras is happening. However there is so much content being produced that is sometimes easy to miss.

The videos below are using Phantom cameras or experimental cameras in the mid 20th century capable of 15 million frames/sec to capture the initial fireball of a nuclear detonation. That rapatronic camera used an array of separate camera modules to reach that speed. However the frames recorded only were fractions of a second

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Phantom Flex4K-GS Introduces Global Shutter!

Phantom Flex4K-GS

The Phantom Flex 4k camera has made a big splash in TV, Film and Youtube with it’s amazing 4k resolution at 1000fps with a large S35mm sensor. However the first iteration of the camera only had a very fast reading; but in the end a rolling shutter sensor. This made the camera an option for visual recording only; leaving scientific research at 4k out of the realm of the camera due to distortion.

That changes today with the Phantom Flex4k-GS which offers the option to use the sensor in both rolling shutter and Global Shutter mode which is a first on a camera of this resolution. Now scientists can use the resolution prowess of the camera  to examine minute detail that needs extreme speeds to be recorded.

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Frog Tongue Science in Slow Motion!

Frog Tongue Science

A new study released by Georgia Tech led by Alexis Noel, Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. student at that institution has revealed the hidden nature and mechanics of how frogs use their squishy and sticky tongues to eat their prey. With acceleration forces  reaching 12 Gs these prey experiment over 4x that of astronauts in a rocket leaving the atmosphere at 3 Gs.

With the use of high speed video cameras  at over 1,000fps the study was able to reveal the complex motion, eye retraction and viscous properties of the frog’s elastic tongue while catching prey.  The frog uses a mucus like substance on the tongue to generate the stickiness necessary to envelop the insect prey without ejecting them off from the brutal speed and force generated.

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