Tag Archives: slow mo

Fake Slow Motion Is It Worth It?

Fake Slow Motion

There has been a lot of work put it developing software that can interpolate frames for video editing and compositing applications. Twixtor in the late 90’s was perhaps the first time the technology could make something worthwhile and really produce acceptable results in a computationally acceptable timeframe.

Today the most used algorithm is Adobe’s Optical Flow in Premiere or Time Warp in After Effects which use vector directional plus acceleration of pixel values to derive in between frame data to generate new frame information from the preceding frame as point A and the next frame as point B.  The results can do some wonders to really slow down things above the frame rate ceiling of the camera.

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Panasonic GH5 Firmware 1.1 Allows 10 Bit 60p 1080!

Panasonic GH5 Firmware 1.1

The Panasonic GH5 ushered the era of 10-bit video recording on a portable prosumer interchangeable lens camera for the first time. Panasonic promised some features which at launch would not make the cut but would be added when firmware was released that would improve the spec sheet.  The new 1.1 version of the Firmware will enable 10bit recording on 1080p 24p, 25p, 29.98, 29.97p, 59.94p & 50p all at 100 Mbps.

While the camera offered 10 Bit recording at 4k from the get go it was not available above 29.97fps which left the 60fps 4k mode out in the cold for the increased color space. The update and all subsequent ones will also do not allow 10 Bit to be used above 30p in 4k so the 60fps UHD spec will remain at 4:2:0 8 Bit color.

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Galaxy S8 Slow Motion Samples!

Galaxy S8 Slow Motion Samples

There was a lot of commotion online when the rumors of the Galaxy S8 having 1000 fps video surfaced. However that turned out to be pure unfounded speculation. Still the phone did offer slow motion of 240fps at 720p which is not bad for a phone but hardly flagship these days. Still that does not detract from the ability to capture cool slow-mo shots.

The quality is close to 720p on the Galaxy S8 but not entirely there. We see some softness, aliasing and moire in the shots with a tendency to be more apparent in diagonal lines and repeating detail textures.  Still the quality is on par with the iPhone 7 and Google Pixel XL phones. We have gathered a few samples for you to judge.

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GH5 Slow Motion New Quality Footage!

GH5 Slow Motion

The Panasonic GH5 has been the camera darling of early 2017 for video enthusiasts and the addition of 120fps, 150fps and 180fps full HD was one of the most awaited features for the camera. Earlier footage showed a decrease in image quality when using higher frame rates on the camera and the appearance of moire and aliasing was evident. It was still far better than what the GH4s 96fps mode was able to do.

Recent new footage has re-examined the slow motion VFR mode and while there is a drop in quality the 180fps mode is still usable for many applications due to it retaining a lot of detail compared to other cameras.  The image is loosing quite a lot of resolution in the vertical so it will not be true full HD when you compare with the up to 60fps mode.

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Strobe Alley Birth of High Speed!

Strobe Alley

Doc Edgerton was the scientist behind the modern high speed camera and imaging techniques. His experiments made slow motion and the possibility of freezing incredibly fast phenomena a possibility.  The principles many decades later remain the same such as extreme amounts of light and ultra fast shutters along with a highly sensitive film or sensor for modern photo and video.

As a piece of history, Strobe Alley is a repository of technology and information from the early days of high speed and what it took to get us here. We found an old video that goes through the place with explanations about these aging strobes and gadgets. You can visit this place at MIT’s Edgerton center if you are ever there but you can also take a look through this footage.

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HIGH SPEED IMAGING COURSE at MIT

HIGH SPEED IMAGING COURSE at MIT

Registration has started at Edgerton Center from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the yearly high speed imaging course geared at the principles of shooting and preparing slow motion setups. The course goes deep into the science and art of slow motion video and has access to some of the most capable high speed gear so that students can use and experiment with first hand experience.

Previous courses have been a great success and the imagery coming out of these classes is pretty jaw dropping. If you can attend the course in June this year it could be just what you were waiting for to jump into the slow motion realm.  Access to this gear is few and far between for even experienced personnel and videographers; plus learning from experts in the field can come in very handy to get better knowledge about the process.

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