Tag Archives: Micro 4/3

Canon New Cinema Camera Will do 240fps in 4k!

Canon it seems is thinking 3 steps ahead of everyone else when it comes to pro 8k video.  After being left behind in the adoption of 4k and playing catch up to the format, they seem intent on making their cameras the new 8k default option with specs that seem out of a dreamer’s wish list.  Be warned that these cameras will probably start at $10k USD and go up from there. The low end should be about 10k to $15k for the C300s at the low end, and the high end a $30k price tag for a C700DR.  

The most impressive of the new rumored cameras is the Canon EOS C700DR (DR Stands for Dynamic Range) which will be capable of recording 4k not just at 120fps but a class-leading 240fps with excellent quality. It also hints at a 180fps mode that will have expanded dynamic range if needed.   It is interesting that 1080p as a slow motion mode is not even considered here but these cameras are geared to a specific market and that is digital cinema which needs much more resolution nowadays than what even 2k can deliver, much less 1080p.  → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 120fps Slowmo Full HD and why to avoid it!

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 120fps Slowmo

The new trend this year is the selfie mirrorless camera being bundled so that Youtube and other social media Vloggers get a camera that can easily capture what they need with little fuzz. It is no secret that camera sales are in free fall and companies will try to market anything and everything to get some sales. Such is the case with the Panasonic Lumix G100. It has a very nice microphone, a diminutive body, a terrific bright day screen, and a very portable and good enough image from a micro 4/3 sensor.

So why all this negativity? Well for a camera that wants to compete with the smaller 1″ sensor but better overall featured Sony ZV-1 with excellent dual pixel tracking AF; the G100 is limited in a variety of ways. The 5x stabilization will only work in 1080p and be only electronic in 4k.  4k itself only lasts 10 minutes which is very constrained for 2020, maybe for 2016 as a spec but not 4 years later. Dig in for more info!

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 Main specs:

  • 20.3MP Digital Live MOS Sensor  m4/3
  • 5184 x 3888 maximum resolution
  • UHD 4K30p Video, Pre-Installed V-Log L (10min limit)
  • 5-Axis Hybrid Image Stabilization (1080p Only)
  • OZO Audio with Subject Tracking
  • ISO 200 to 25600 (Extended: 100 to 25600)
  • Video Modes: MP4 4:2:0 8-Bit
  • UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/29.97p (10min)
  • Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 29.97p/59.94p
  • Slow Motion 120fps Full HD Mode-
  • 12 to 32mm Lens kit included
  • MSRP: $747.99 with lens and tripod included

For a camera and lens combo under $750 USD it may seem like a pretty good package but when you dig in the details it becomes apparent that you are getting a subpar kit that could have been so much better.

What about Slow Motion?

The video below by Gordon Laing shows a sample of the slow motion on the camera that is very good and will give you a good indication of the per-pixel quality. It is also a very complete review with AF tests and the audio modes.

Panasonic Lumix G100 review vs ZV1 M50 G90 G95 by Gordon Laing:

The full HD 120fps looks to be on par with other Lumix cameras which is not bad but it is also way below others in their line of cameras like 180fps and 240fps which is not even a choice here.

As a slow motion camera, it is competitive with other 120fps cameras in full HD but not much else. We cannot recommend it over other options like the Sony RX series that can do 240fps in near full HD (See Here) with pretty good results.

Other things:

The stabilization which is essential for blogging is limited in the 5 axis mode to 1080p which is ridiculous, you get electronic image shift stabilization for 4k and a 10-minute recording limit on that mode which is very much a non-starter for vloggers.

Ozo audio in the video above is really the most interesting feature of this camera and something we hope to see in the Lumix line from now on. The omnidirectional microphones allow the camera to estimate the location of the person speaking and link the face detection autofocus algorithm so it stays sharp during recording even when you move out of the frame and back in.

The AF technology used is DFD or Depth from Defocus which is used in the Lumix line of cameras and while excellent for still images it still can’t compete directly with dual pixel AF from other brands that use contrast and Phase detection along with object and animal/people tracking to be very consistent in the video modes. DFD has a hit and miss that is hated by many and a clear let down by today’s AF standards, especially for Vlogging.

Panasonic G100: Hands-on look at a lightweight multimedia powerhouse by imagingresource → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Lumix Camera as a Webcam using USB for free!

Lumix Camera as a Webcam

Panasonic has released a Beta tethering software package for use in Windows 10 that allows you to control your Lumix camera from the computer to shoot images and video while at the same time use it to monitor the live view video signal with now the specific change that lets you remove the overlay display items from the camera to get a clean feed to your video conferencing software.

However, it is not that easy to get it to work and requires a couple of free pieces of software to let you extract the live view feed from the camera and redirect it to a video conferencing application of your choice.  We were able to get it to work well and it really makes a difference compared to the small sensor webcams you have been using.  Place a 1.4 lens in the camera and look at the beautiful feed that will result by using a professional camera and optics system to make you look better.

Lumix Camera as a Webcam what you need:

Cameras supported on the first release of the Beta.
(Note you will need to input your camera serial number to download the software)

  • DC-S1R
  • DC-S1
  • DC-S1H
  • DC-GH5S
  • DC-G9
  • DC-GH5

Official Computer Requirements:

  • OS: Windows 10 (32bit/64bit)
  • CPU: Intel CPU of 1 GHz or higher
  • Display: 1024 x 768 pixels or more
  • RAM: 1GB or more (32bit),2GB or more (64bit)
  • HDD: Free space of 200 MB or more for installation
  • Interface: USB 3.0/3.1

It is good to see the Lumix GH5 on the list as it is one of the best Lumix cameras for video recording ever released and many of our readers own it.

In order to get the video feed to get routed to your video conferencing software you are going to need to install these three programs in your Windows 10 PC:

  1. The Luimix Tethering Software Beta!
  2. OBS Free Open Source Video Capture Software!
  3. OBS Virtual Cam Plug In!

The excellent video below by Richard Wong will guide you through the steps to do this properly and activate the software for a variety of uses.  Support Richard by subscribing to his great channel here!

Setup your Panasonic Camera for Live Streaming / Webcam (GH5/G9/S1/S1H..etc) by Richard Wong:

Things to think about:

Make sure you have enough battery. On our test GH5 we needed to have battery power or AC connected for it to work as USB power is not available.  If other cameras can do it from the Linux Family it becomes easier as the PC can feed power essentially forever while you video chat.

There is some lag reported by users as the PC is taxed by capturing the video bypass and encoding can create a delay for webcam uses.  It is all a function of the speed of your computer here and the faster the better.  It would be ideal for Panasonic to allow for direct webcam pass-through from the Lumix cameras to video streaming software without requiring OBS. By using a driver the camera would show up as a webcam option without configuration steps. Lag should also be eliminated. This however is a workable solution and great first step.

The software as of now is only available for Windows 10, Mac OS and Linux support is not yet here and we hope it does in the future. Windows is being used as a testbed for bugs and once it is stable and solid enough we could see it being ported to at least Mac OS X.

Enjoy your new professional streaming solution and wow your boss, co-workers, friends or family with a beautiful image.  -HSC 

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Z CAM E2 M4 Slow Motion With Affordable 4k 160fps!

Z CAM E2 M4 Slow Motion

The new Z CAM E2 – M4 Micro 4/3″ sensor cinema 4k camera offers performance that punches way above its own price weight of just $1,499 @ Adorama which is $500 less than the very similar regular Z CAM E2 just lacking Multicam synch support which is a very minor trade off considering the power and benefits you gain.   It has Triple native ISO of  80 / 160 / 800 and 13 stops of DR using their ZLog profile, and 16 stops of DR in WDR mode which does some HDR processing.

The frame rates are also outstanding for such a low-cost camera and while the higher setting requires H.265 encoding which for many is not ideal considering it lowers the bit depth from 10 bits to 8, it offers what many cameras only dream of.  160fps in 4k in beautiful resolution and up to 240fps in 1080p which has very good quality with some compromises.

Z CAM E2 and E2 M4 Main Specs:

  • Dynamic Range13~15 Stops (Z-Log2) / 16 Stops (with WDR activated)
  • Sensor Type4/3″ WDR CMOS Sensor
  • Effective Pixels10.28M
  • Lens MountMicro Four Thirds  19.0 x 13.0 mm
  • Max Variable Frame Rate120 fps for 4096 x 2160 (H.265 only)
    120 fps for 3840 x 2160 (H.265 only)
    150 fps for 4096 x 1728 (H.265 only)
    160 fps for 3840 x 1620 (H.265 only)
    160 fps for 2704 x 1600 (H.265 only)
    59.94 fps for 3696 x 2772 (Apple ProRes & H.265)
    59.94 fps for 3312 x 2760 (Apple ProRes & H.265)
    240 fps for 1920 x 1080 (H.265 only)
  • MediaCFAST 2.0
  • Max Bit RateH.265 / H.264
    300 Mbps for 4096 x 2160 / 3840 x 2160 / 4096 x 1728 / 3840 x 1620 / 3696 x 2772 / 3312 x 2760 / 2704 x 1600
    200 Mbps for 1920 x 1080
    -ProRes
    Please check “Apple ProRes White Paper” for the bit rate of ProRes encoding.
  • 12-Bit ProRes RAW
    10-bit (H.265 & ProRes) & 8-bit (H.264)
  • Triple native ISO 80 / 160 / 800
  • Video EncoderProRes Raw, ProRes 422 HQ / ProRes 422 / ProRes 422 LT / ProRes 422
    ZRAW (partial debayer) / Proxy / H.265 main 10 profile / H.264 high profile
  • Connectivity
  • HDMI
  • HDMI 2.0 Type A (video output up to C4K @60fps)
  • USB USB 3.0 Type C for camera control & data transfer only
  • I/O  10-pin LEMO port for synchronization (requires additional Sync Cable, not included)
  • COM    DB-9 connector, supports RS-232
  • Remote Control  2.5 mm jack socket (Sony LANC compatible)
  • Audio In – 3.5 mm stereo jack socket for active microphone only, or 5-pin LEMO port for dual-channel XLR microphone (requires additional XLR audio connector)
  • Audio-out  3.5 mm stereo jack socket
  • Wi-Fi 802.11n, 2.4G with external antenna port
  • Ethernet  Gigabit Ethernet port for control, setting & live streaming
  • Power  Battery Sony NP-F series compatible (Battery not included)
  • External Power Supply  – DC 12V 5A (4-pin LEMO socket), with LEMO connector and AC/DC power adapter
  • Material  Aluminum Alloy
  • Weight  757 g (without lens)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D) 91.2 mm x 99.2 mm x 89.1 mm (without lens)

So just from a specs point of view we can see the E2 being a real powerhouse with a variety of excellent options for shooters. If you also ad a speedbooster then you get APS-C like performance on a sensor that performs like that of the Panasonic GH5s with excellent quality up to ISO 6400-12800.

Z CAM E2 M4 Slow Motion how good is it?

The slow motion aspects for the Z Cam E2 M4 are class-leading with 160fps at 4k DCI and UHD with what we have confirmed to be pristine quality with no real artifacts besides H.265 compression. You will of course get 8-bit limitations on gradients and single shade subjects like blue skies but for everything else will be more than adequate.  See the beautiful sample below by Ludeman Productions of the E2 shooting in 4k at 160fps H.265.

ZCAM E2: 160p by Ludeman Productions:

When it comes to 240fps there is of course a trade-off that we have seen in the GH5s and other cameras that use this similar sensor design. The color, dynamic range, and frame rates are beautiful but you do get jagged edges on detail segments of the frame and especially lines with the characteristic stair-stepping of aliasing by the fact that the frames are captured by throwing out some lines.  It is still very good and for many users, it will be just as capable but if you value pixel perfection then the 240fps 1080p mode will disappoint purists.  See the samples below to get a sense of the quality offered here.

Z Cam E2 240 FPS Fountain by Newsshooter: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Cronos HD 2.1 First footage samples surface!

Cronos HD 2.1 First footage samples

The team at Krontech.ca has been shipping the first units of the Chronos 2.1-HD 4/3″ Sensor high-speed camera to their customers and in turn, footage has started to become available online showing what this new super affordable 1080p slow-mo cam can do.  We will be reviewing a unit in the future once the firmware is more polished and will give it a good spin to finally rank it in our camera guide.

At first glance, we have a very positive reaction to the footage shown. The noise control and per-pixel detail are excellent and a clear cut above what the much smaller 2/3″ sensor on the Chronos 1.4c was able to deliver.   Larger sensors are a must for high-speed cameras to make use of more available light locations.   We have gathered some excellent video examples that will let you have a pretty good idea of what you can shoot and at what quality level with this camera.

Chronos 2.1 HD Main Specs:

  • 1080p, 4/3” format image sensor
  • 2.1 gigapixels per second
  • 1000fps @ 1080p
  • up to 24 046fps at
    lower resolutions
  • 8GB, 16GB and 32GB high-speed RAM buffer options for 2.7, 5.5 and 11.0 second record time respectively.
  • High sensitivity base ISO of 500 (Color) and 1000 (Monochrome) enables shooting with modest lighting.
  • l battery lasts for 1 hour of recording
  • Runs indefinitely on AC adapter or external power source
  • Many lenses supported: Nikon F, Canon EF and C mounts available as field-swappable options
  • Starting at USD $5,000.00
Resolution and Frame Rate Table as of February 2020 (Could differ in future firmware):

There is also a new monthly newsletter on the Krontech website so you are up to date with the news on these camerashttps://www.krontech.ca/chronos-newsletter/

Cronos HD 2.1 First footage samples:

A few notes before you look at these video samples: These are early beta firmware samples which means that the quality will probably improve from here in several aspects. The most obvious will be the vertical column banding artifact that can show up on higher frame rates and less than ideal lighting conditions.   We also see room for improvement in the color-science especially in reds and maybe some highlight tweaking.

However, at first glance, they look really good and a clear improvement from the earlier product from Krontech.ca the Chronos 1.4c.  This camera can now go head to head with much more expensive competitors as the image quality has increased greatly. Enjoy the samples!

Water Drop Slow Motion by Laurent NICOLET:

Chronos 2.1 HD Initial test at 1000fps 2142fps 3385fps 5406fps by Scott Aichner: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Octopus Cinema Camera Upgradeable Slow Motion Kit?

Octopus Cinema Camera Upgradeable Slow Motion

The recently announced Octopus Cinema Camera with a modular sensor, mount, and other components could, in theory, become a customizable professional solution slow motion camera that is unencumbered by firm specs but by a fluid and upgradeable sensor and component path.  The Axiom camera is also something akin to this but has yet to ship. The Octopus has in prototype form been fitted with a 4/3 sensor capable of up to 240fps in 2k RAW and a full-frame that allows 3k up to 100fps.

The body looks eerily similar to Phantom cameras with the white machined exterior with fans and ports protruding the body.  While 240fps at 2k is not what we could call really professional slow motion, it is based on an open architecture in hardware and software that could window the sensor down and possibly offer more frame rates at 1080p and 720p for maybe a 480fps RAW capture in HD.

Octopus Cinema Camera Specs:

The 4/3 sensor is the Sony IMX253 which offers a global shutter mode and high frame rate support. You can read more about this sensor here: Sony IMX 253 information. This sensor should be able to record 480fps at HD 720p if the camera is programmed to do it.

At 4/3 you get 240fps at 2k which will probably allow that at 1080p which is not bad considering you get 12 bit RAW DNG capture. You can also save in HEVC h.265 codec at up to 900mbits/sec which is a great option.

The full frame sensor will be the CMV20000 (Information here) which is a pretty advanced 20MP sensor allowing 5k capture at up to 48fps.  This sensor will be geared more for cinema people while the 4/3 would cater markets for TV, Web, and documentary. For slow motion, it is clear the 4/3 sensor makes more sense.

We can already fantasize of another sensor option that allows higher frame rates and a possibility to program the camera to be a true slow motion powerhouse with pre-record, post-triggering and remote monitoring.

Sample footage Samples Low Light in B&W at normal frame rate:

“INTERCHANGEABLE SPECIALIST IMAGE SENSORS

XIMEA provide a range of high-performance imaging modules which can be interchanged allowing the OCTOPUS CAMERA to have a fully upgradable image sensor.

Specialist sensors available include specifications such as full-frame 35mm, Global Shutter, native Monochrome and more.”

The power of a platform like this is based on what you can do with the customizability. If you could place a 2000fps 1080p sensor, for example, you could have a very capable production camera that really shoots slow video that can be analyzed professionally.

“UPGRADEABLE OPEN-PLATFORM HARDWARE
The OCTOPUS CAMERA uses the compact Intel® NUC as the processing board. Components can be removed and upgraded including the board itself when newer boards are available.”

Since the main component board is also upgradeable you can, in theory, get a board full of fast DDR memory for loop record at a fraction of the cost of a phantom camera.

The big If!

All this sounds great but the release date for the initial camera is sometime in 2020 with no price mentioned. The amount of work this camera needs to become a reality is pretty huge. Projects like the Axiom have thousands of hours of work by really incredible people and has yet to ship in final form.

The Octopus team is small according to information on the web and there is only a prototype product shown.  We saw the Fran camera go down in flames with big promises just recently and there is no reprieve when you mess up in the camera business.

We wish the Octopus team much success and hope to see a high frame rate sample or better yet, a module of sensor and board that shoots 1000fps or more in the future.  A camera like this could allow for an upgradeable slow motion camera system that grows as fast as technology allows, making it a first in the high speed market. Disruption could be the best thing in slow motion gear or just a spark that fizzles out by bad execution. Lets hope is the former. -HSC

You can find more information about Octopus Cinema Camera at the official website. http://octopuscinema.com 

They also have a mailing list to get updates at the same site.