Tag Archives: sensor

Nikon Stacked CMOS Sensor Will do 1000fps in 4k!

Nikon Stacked CMOS Sensor

Nikon Japan has been busy creating the next generation of 1″ stacked sensors.  The latest is a 17.84 Megapixel stacked design with hyper-fast memory interconnect that shoots up to 1000fps at 4k resolution which is no slouch. The sensor is still in development but it will be a possibility to see it in a camera that could compete head to head with the Sony RX series which now dominate prosumer P&S sales.  It was announced at ISSCC (International Solid-State Circuits Conference) held in San Francisco, February 15, 2021.

The sensor works by shooting in buckets of 16 x 16 pixels as one block, and then subsequently 264 x 264 pixel blocks (4224 x 4224 pixels) are conformed to form the final image at nearly 18MP.  It is unclear at this time if 4k video will be a windowed resolution or a supersampled then reduced final image from the full sensor.  The market for this sensor goes beyond consumer cameras as it is aimed at other applications like self-driving cars and production lines. → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Fujifilm X-E4 Slow Motion 240fps disappoints!

Fujifilm X-E4 Slow Motion

The recently released camera called the Fujifilm X-E4 shares many of the traits of their lower brethren but also from the higher-end models in a compact package. It ditches the better viewfinder for a small 2.36 million dot EVF that makes it a bit hard to see your composition but that also allows the camera to be smaller and more stylish than the beefy SLR style Fujis out there.

The Fujifilm X-E4 Slow Motion feature is the same as found on cameras like the excellent Fujifilm XS-10 which is a 120fps or 240fps full HD component that records in camera. Why are we not excited? well, the quality is lower than expected with some aliasing and moire characteristics that are so last decade. When are manufacturers going to offer the same 1080p quality at all frame rates instead of relegating the 120fps and 240fps modes to the lower bitrate and detail bin?

Fujifilm X-E4 Main Specs:

  • 26.1MP APS-C X-Trans BSI CMOS 4 Sensor
  • DCI/UHD 4K at 24p, 25p & 30 fps
  • 2.36m-Dot 0.62x OLED EVF
  • X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • Compact classic body
  • 3.0″ 1.62m-Dot 180° Tilting Touchscreen
  • 425-Point Hybrid AF System
  • Film Simulation Modes
  • Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Connectivity
  • Lens Kit includes: XF 27mm f/2.8 R WR Lens
  • MSRP: 1,049.00 USD Lens Kit or $849.95 Body only!
  • Release date March 11th, 2021

Fujifilm X-E4 Slow Motion Specs:

Full HD (1920 x 1080)

  • 50p/59.94p
  • 100p/119.88p
  • 200p/239.76p
  • [100 to 200 Mb/s]

While we get the same frame rates as the best value/performance on Fuji’s arsenal the XS-10, you get the aliased version of the footage. While the final quality is passable for your Youtube Vlog, it will not be ready for more professional uses, the pixelation and stair-stepping looks like badly captured 720p video in a 1080p wrapper.

The video below by the amusing and great Kai W, has a sample of 200p video on the camera at the 4-minute mark.  You can clearly see the aliasing in the footage when you load it at full resolution.  We expect the 120fps mode to be much better but we already get pretty good 120p footage from most cameras nowadays. The 240fps mode is the standout here and it disappointed us fully.

Fujifilm X-E4 Hands-on Impressions WIN THIS CAMERA! by: Kai W

But what about?

Can you still make a remarkable slow motion shot with this camera?  In a word, Yes take a look at the Fujifilm’s XS-10 240fps mode which is probably the same as the one in the X-E4 as they share a lot in common feature-wise. Look closely at the very well shot video below:

Fujifilm X-S10 – 240fps slow motion test by Coastal Bay 4K: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Slow Motion on DJI Pocket 2 & Fuji X-S10 Offers 240fps!

Slow Motion on DJI Pocket 2 & Fuji X-S10

Two very different new cameras were released this week that are able to shoot in 240fps Full HD 1080p. One is the Fujifilm X-S10 which is an all-rounder mirrorless camera with 6 stop IBIS and cinema video profiles for $999 body only, the other is the sequel to the very well received DJI Osmo Pocket now named DJI Pocket 2 dropping the OSMO part of the name & starting at $349 in its most basic form. Slow Motion on DJI Pocket 2 & Fuji X-S10 is close on both.

Both cameras are able to do 120fps as well but the interest peaks at 240p where the speed makes things moving slower more detailed, especially people as at that speed lifeforms moving relatively slow are excellent subjects. For faster animals like birds or flying insects, you need many more frames per second, usually in the 700+ range to create a good enough effect.

Slow Motion on DJI Pocket 2 & Fuji X-S10 – Two cameras that are very different but can shoot the same fps!

Fuji X-S10 Video Modes:

Video Recording Modes H.264/MOV 4:2:0 8-Bit
DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p [100 to 200 Mb/s]
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p [100 to 200 Mb/s]
DCI 2K (2048 x 1080) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p [50 to 200 Mb/s]
Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p/100p/119.88p/200p/239.76p [50 to 200 Mb/s]

So starting with the Fuji X-S10 we cans ee that it has a plethora of video recording modes with the absence of the now much coveted 4k 60p which is not here in any form. We do have a 2k cinema mode with 60p which is an ok consolation prize but in a world of 4k it seems they could have added that 4k 60p just to be competitive.

We get 100fps and 200fps at 1080p in PAL format and 120fps and 240fps in NTSC mode. As far as we know every camera can be switched with a single menu to be able to use either of the two systems.

The great news here is that the slow motion modes at 1080p offer up to 200Mb/s in the codec which is pretty remarkable considering not many cameras pass 50Mb/sec in these modes.

The bad news is that the slow motion seems a bit mushy and pixelated which is an unwelcome sight. We found a short video showing this mode at the video below at 8:16:

Fujifilm X-S10 Hands-on Review by DPReview TV:

While we need more samples for full confirmation it does look more like a 720p up-rez than true 1080p, which is common in cameras that shoot these kinds of frame rates and are not dedicated slow motion cameras.  Even Jordan the reviewer above states that the quality of the footage at 240p is nothing to brag about and it is pretty low quality. Kind of sad considering the maximum bitrate of 200Mbps at 1080p.

The Fuji X-S10 is an interesting camera that can do a lot of things right, it is great that it offers very good frame rates as options and we will re-visit this camera in the future when more samples are available. If you are a Fuji system enthusiast, we actually think the new X-S10 is probably the best bargain for a powerful camera in Fuji Land and you really cannot go wrong if you want to shoot video with its great stabilization and flip out Vari-Angle screen.

DJI Pocket 2 Video Modes:

Slow Motion:

  • 240 fps Recorded at 1920 x 1080p
  • 120 fps Recorded at 1920 x 1080p
Video Rec Formats 3840 x 2160p at 24/25/30/48/50/60 fps (100 Mb/s MP4 via H.264/AVC, MPEG-4)
2720 x 1530p at 24/25/30/48/50/60 fps (100 Mb/s H.264/AVC, MPEG-4)
1920 x 1080p at 24/25/30/48/60 fps (100 Mb/s MP4 via H.264/AVC, MPEG-4)

The DJI Pocket 2 is a very impressive device. On the one hand, it has a larger sensor than its predecessor, one rivaling the old P&S prosumer cameras like the Canon G series back in the last decade.  The sensor is  1/1.7″ 64 Megapixels which allows for 8x true zoom crop on the image if needed.

On the other hand, it has a gimbal that is the main selling point that this camera has going for it. A true stabilized system akin to those on DJI drones but on your pocket/hand.  The performance of stabilization is remarkable and the addition of an optional lavalier mic. option with a clip-on module makes it ideal for Vloggers to shoot on a minute and cheap all in one package.

The slow motion modes at 120fps and 240fps are there and easily accessible which is great news since the original Pocket maxed out at 120fps with a 200fps hack that was not really usable.

We found a couple of great samples of slow motion 120p and 240p in the video review below at 9min 45seconds run time:

DJI Pocket 2 | Wider FOV, Bigger Sensor, 240fps by Potato Jet: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12k Camera Setup 7 new Frame Rates!

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12k Camera Setup 7

Blackmagic Design has released Camera Setup 7.0 which upgrades the URSA Mini Pro 12k camera in several areas including improved frame rates at different resolutions.  At 12k the maximum frame rate has increased to 75fps from 60fps and at 4k we now have up to 240fps in BRAW format from 220fps on a Super 16mm crop of the sensor. We also get 8k at up to 160fps from a maximum before of 110fps which is improved by leveraging the fast pipeline in the camera and delivering usable frame rates with good multiples.

While the camera is not cheap at $9,995, it is certainly a bargain considering the resolution and frame rates you have access to in BRAW RAW-Like format.  It may be essentially the most powerful camera you can buy today for this price range and available with an F, EF, or PL mount the flexibility is there if needed.  Blackmagic Design are also the owners of DaVinci Resolve and usually bundled it with their cameras. It makes for a hard to beat all in one system for shooting, editing, and postproduction. Dig in for more details…

Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro 12k – Full High Speed Frame Rates After Update:

12K 17:9 full sensor up to 60 fps
12K 2.4:1 up to 75 fps
8K DCI full sensor up to 120 fps
4K DCI full sensor up to 120 fps
8K 2.4:1 and 4K 2.4:1 up to 160 fps

6K Super 16 up to 120 fps
4K Super 16 up to 240 fps

Ursa Mini Pro 12K Unboxing & Footage by Epic Light Media: → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Canon EOS R5 Makes it Expensive to record 120fps 4k Video!

Canon EOS R5

Canon has now released the final specs and estimated release dates for the EOS R5 and R6 cameras. There is a lot of good advancement in features especially in video mode as what many believe is an afront to Sony and Panasonic who dominate video recording on ILCs.  The R5 can record 24fps and 30fps 8k video or 8192 x 4320 pixels in RAW quality which is a staggering 1TB of storage or 2600 Mbits/s for only 51 minutes of recording time. That means that every hour you will eat up through a full TB of your RAID backup storage. We see this mode being transcoded to an intermediate format like Blackmagic RAW or BRAW or Apple ProRes as soon as possible.

There is more bad news, on the 120fps 4k front there is no other option of recording but All-I which saves every frame independently in 10-bit 4:2:2 which is good for excellent quality but at the cost of 1,880 Mbits/s  which is 224MB/sec or 13,447MB / minute of recording time. Better get a ton of memory cards and hard drives ready!

EOS R5 Video Specs:

Video Rec Modes Raw 12-Bit
DCI 8K (8192 x 4320) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p [2600 Mb/s]
H.265 4:2:2 10-Bit
DCI 8K (8192 x 4320) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p [680 to 1300 Mb/s]
UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p [680 to 1300 Mb/s]
DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p/59.94p/100p/119.88p [170 to 1880 Mb/s]
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p/100p/119.88p [170 to 1880 Mb/s]
Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p [28 to 230 Mb/s]
H.264 4:2:0 8-Bit
DCI 8K (8192 x 4320) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p [470 to 1300 Mb/s]
UHD 8K (7680 x 4320) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p [470 to 1300 Mb/s]
DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at 23.976p/24.00p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p/100p/119.88p [120 to 1880 Mb/s]
UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p/100p/119.88p [120 to 1880 Mb/s]
Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 23.976p/25p/29.97p/50p/59.94p [12 to 180 Mb/s]

You read that right 120fps 4k video on the EOS R5 is only possible at the 1,880Mbits/sec data rate even in H.264 mode. Also interesting to know is the lack of 120fps Full HD 1080p or higher fps modes which are common on cameras from Panasonic or Sony.

 

Overheating what?

Yes, the R5 gets overheated after recording video on the following modes and times:

  • 8k RAW 30p/24p – 20 Minutes rec time
  • 8k NON-RAW 30p/24p – 20 Minutes rec time
  • 4k 120fps – 15 Minutes rec time
  • 4k 60p – 35Min Rec Time No Crop
  • 4k 60p – Crop Mode 5.1k Oversampling – 25 Min Rec Time
  • 4k High-Quality 30p- 8.2k Oversampling- 30 Min Rec Time
  • 4k 30p – No Overheating Limit

We do not find any of these limits to be unbearable if you shoot clips of a few minutes but for event shooters, this is not the camera for you for many reasons, chief among the rec time limit, and secondly, the massive recording space needed.  For slow motion, the limit of 4k 120fps at 15 minutes is probably more than you will ever need so that is not a problem. See the video below:

Canon EOS R5 the TRUTH about OVERHEATING!: Armando Ferreira

It costs what :-0?

Yes, the EOS R5 costs a staggering $3,899.00 US Body only and expected to ship at the end of July on the 31st.   The camera it stems from the venerable 5D Mark IV DSLR went on sale in September 2016 with a retail price of $3,499 (Now about $2,000USD), so the new R5 is now $400 USD more expensive at launch plus the new lenses are really expensive plus also needed to get the most out of this camera’s 45MP sensor and be able to get the 8 stop Sensor IBIS Stabilization with lens+body.  A good R5 kit will probably cost you around $10k for a three-lens setup with body and memory cards.  Having the latest and greatest from Canon or any other big brand will cost you, and this is a prime example of it.

4k 120fps Mode samples?

Gladly we were able to find 4k 120fps video samples from the R5 and they look very good along with full AF which is an excellent feature to have in slow motion recording see below:

Canon EOS R5 Field Test – with 4k 120fps samples:  Jarrad Seng → Continue Reading Full Post ←

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 120fps Slowmo Full HD and why to avoid it!

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 120fps Slowmo

The new trend this year is the selfie mirrorless camera being bundled so that Youtube and other social media Vloggers get a camera that can easily capture what they need with little fuzz. It is no secret that camera sales are in free fall and companies will try to market anything and everything to get some sales. Such is the case with the Panasonic Lumix G100. It has a very nice microphone, a diminutive body, a terrific bright day screen, and a very portable and good enough image from a micro 4/3 sensor.

So why all this negativity? Well for a camera that wants to compete with the smaller 1″ sensor but better overall featured Sony ZV-1 with excellent dual pixel tracking AF; the G100 is limited in a variety of ways. The 5x stabilization will only work in 1080p and be only electronic in 4k.  4k itself only lasts 10 minutes which is very constrained for 2020, maybe for 2016 as a spec but not 4 years later. Dig in for more info!

Panasonic Lumix DC-G100 Main specs:

  • 20.3MP Digital Live MOS Sensor  m4/3
  • 5184 x 3888 maximum resolution
  • UHD 4K30p Video, Pre-Installed V-Log L (10min limit)
  • 5-Axis Hybrid Image Stabilization (1080p Only)
  • OZO Audio with Subject Tracking
  • ISO 200 to 25600 (Extended: 100 to 25600)
  • Video Modes: MP4 4:2:0 8-Bit
  • UHD 4K (3840 x 2160) at 23.976p/29.97p (10min)
  • Full HD (1920 x 1080) at 29.97p/59.94p
  • Slow Motion 120fps Full HD Mode-
  • 12 to 32mm Lens kit included
  • MSRP: $747.99 with lens and tripod included

For a camera and lens combo under $750 USD it may seem like a pretty good package but when you dig in the details it becomes apparent that you are getting a subpar kit that could have been so much better.

What about Slow Motion?

The video below by Gordon Laing shows a sample of the slow motion on the camera that is very good and will give you a good indication of the per-pixel quality. It is also a very complete review with AF tests and the audio modes.

Panasonic Lumix G100 review vs ZV1 M50 G90 G95 by Gordon Laing:

The full HD 120fps looks to be on par with other Lumix cameras which is not bad but it is also way below others in their line of cameras like 180fps and 240fps which is not even a choice here.

As a slow motion camera, it is competitive with other 120fps cameras in full HD but not much else. We cannot recommend it over other options like the Sony RX series that can do 240fps in near full HD (See Here) with pretty good results.

Other things:

The stabilization which is essential for blogging is limited in the 5 axis mode to 1080p which is ridiculous, you get electronic image shift stabilization for 4k and a 10-minute recording limit on that mode which is very much a non-starter for vloggers.

Ozo audio in the video above is really the most interesting feature of this camera and something we hope to see in the Lumix line from now on. The omnidirectional microphones allow the camera to estimate the location of the person speaking and link the face detection autofocus algorithm so it stays sharp during recording even when you move out of the frame and back in.

The AF technology used is DFD or Depth from Defocus which is used in the Lumix line of cameras and while excellent for still images it still can’t compete directly with dual pixel AF from other brands that use contrast and Phase detection along with object and animal/people tracking to be very consistent in the video modes. DFD has a hit and miss that is hated by many and a clear let down by today’s AF standards, especially for Vlogging.

Panasonic G100: Hands-on look at a lightweight multimedia powerhouse by imagingresource → Continue Reading Full Post ←